The Opioid Epidemic: An Epidemiological Review of the Current Landscape

The Opioid Epidemic: An Epidemiological Review of the Current Landscape


Back to Package

Please register for the program at the following link: https://cswe.zoom.us/webinar/r...

About the Webinar:

This presentation will review the origins and trajectory of the current opioid epidemic, now described as being in its fourth wave. Considered will be the current epidemiology of the epidemic, particularly opioid-overdose related fatalities; the effectiveness of and potential gaps in current harm reduction strategies such as overdose education and naloxone distribution and drug checking services that provide fentanyl and xylazine test strips or on-site testing; principal barriers to expansion of buprenorphine prescribing among health care providers; and medication for opioid use disorder treatment initiation and engagement; and the science underscoring the significance of co-occurring tobacco use disorder among persons addicted to opioids and entering MOUD treatment.


Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the 4 historical "waves" of the opioid epidemic and the primary factors driving overdose related fatalities at present
  2. Identify the epidemiological groups disproportionately experiencing opioid-overdose related fatalities and understand the reasons why these groups are most affected 
  3. Review how specific drug use risk behaviors interact with psychosocial factors to increase risk for opioid overdoses
  4. Summarize how the harm reduction approach has recently been
    re-interpreted from the original models, making it potentially less effective for treatment initiation

Moderator:

Lili Windsor, PhD, MSW, Professor of Social Work and Associate Dean for Research. School of Social Work, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign

Presenters:

James A. Swartz, PhD, Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Reasearch in the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois - Chicago

Funding for this initiative was made possible by cooperative agreement no. 1H79TI086770 from SAMHSA. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

For more information on Providers Clinical Support System - Medication for Opioid Use Disorder, visit https://pcssnow.org/courses/

PCSS-MOUD Funding Statement:

Funding for this initiative was made possible by cooperative agreement no. 1H79TI086770 from SAMHSA. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

ASWB ACE CE Language: 

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), provider #1163, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. CSWE maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 01/23/2018 - 01/23/2027. Social workers completing this course receive 1.00 continuing education credits.     

Key:

Complete
Failed
Available
Locked
Registration - The Opioid Epidemic, Harm Reduction, and Related Issues: Thoughts from Thirty Years of Epidemiological, Field, and Clinical Research
07/11/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)  |  60 minutes
07/11/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)  |  60 minutes This presentation will review the origins and trajectory of the current opioid epidemic, now described as being in its fourth wave. Considered will be the current epidemiology of the epidemic, particularly opioid-overdose related fatalities; the effectiveness of and potential gaps in current harm reduction strategies such as overdose education and naloxone distribution and drug checking services that provide fentanyl and xylazine test strips or on-site testing; principal barriers to expansion of buprenorphine prescribing among health care providers; and medication for opioid use disorder treatment initiation and engagement; and the science underscoring the significance of co-occurring tobacco use disorder among persons addicted to opioids and entering MOUD treatment.